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  • Locations: Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Program Terms: UC Summer Abroad
  • Homepage: Click to visit
  • Program Sponsor: UC San Diego Global Seminars 
Dates / Deadlines:
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year UCM Deadline Campus Decision Date Start Date End Date
UC Summer Abroad 2020 02/28/2020 ** Rolling Admission TBA TBA

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of acceptance into this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Click here for a definition of this term Minimum GPA: 2 Click here for a definition of this term Class standing: 1-Freshman, 2-Sophomore, 3-Junior, 4-Senior, 5-Graduate student, 6-Other
Language of instruction: English Click here for a definition of this term Areas of study: Sociology
Program Description:
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oaxacaMigration and Globalization in Mexico

Why you should go

The American war in Vietnam caused the death of over three million Vietnamese and 58,000 Americans. Despite the magnitude of the dislocations and rupture experienced by the Vietnamese, at least ninety percent of all studies of the “Vietnam War” in English focus on privileged American experiences and perspectives. Relatedly, most courses on the Vietnam War in American universities focus mainly or even completely on the American experience in Vietnam and the long-term consequences of the war on American society; rarely are works by and about Vietnamese are assigned in these courses.

Departing from the almost-exclusive focus on the American experience, this course examines the impact of the American war in Vietnam on three populations: Americans, Vietnamese (both North and South), and the Viet Kieu (the post-1975 population of overseas Vietnamese). We will supplement scholarly texts on the Vietnam War with cultural texts produced by both Americans and Vietnamese, including films and documentaries, novels and poems, and visits to war museums and monuments. As this is an Ethnic Studies course, we will pay particular attention to the role of race, gender, sexuality and colonialism in our examination of the Vietnam War and its aftermath.Who should goThis course is designed for all intellectually curious students interested in the following topics: refugees and immigrants; U.S.-Asia relations; Southeast Asia; international politics; U.S. history; transnationalism; and race, gender, and sexuality. Students from all majors — but especially ethnic studies, critical gender studies, history, political science, sociology, and literature — are welcome to join us.Meet the professorOriginally from Vietnam, Yén Lê Espiritu is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UCSD, where she has been on the faculty since 1990. An award-winning teacher, she is deeply committed to undergraduate teaching and mentoring. She has published widely on Asian American panethnicity, gender and migration, and U.S. colonialism and wars in Asia. Her most recent book is on the Vietnam War: Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refugees (University of California Press, 2014).

Who should go

This course is designed for all intellectually curious students interested in the following topics: refugees and immigrants; U.S.-Asia relations; Southeast Asia; international politics; U.S. history; transnationalism; and race, gender, and sexuality. Students from all majors — but especially ethnic studies, critical gender studies, history, political science, sociology, and literature — are welcome to join us.Meet the professorOriginally from Vietnam, Yén Lê Espiritu is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UCSD, where she has been on the faculty since 1990. An award-winning teacher, she is deeply committed to undergraduate teaching and mentoring. She has published widely on Asian American panethnicity, gender and migration, and U.S. colonialism and wars in Asia. Her most recent book is on the Vietnam War: Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refugees (University of California Press, 2014).

Meet the professor

Originally from Vietnam, Yén Lê Espiritu is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UCSD, where she has been on the faculty since 1990. An award-winning teacher, she is deeply committed to undergraduate teaching and mentoring. She has published widely on Asian American panethnicity, gender and migration, and U.S. colonialism and wars in Asia. Her most recent book is on the Vietnam War: Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refugees (University of California Press, 2014).